TD-3 Flying Circus

Powered Models are Fun / for Dad ... for Son

Dad: TD-1 Skymaster,  Son: TD-4 Flight Trainer.

 

"Save the friendly Space Bug species!"

Decal from the box of a 1952 Space Bug.

 

A Space Bug Decal.

Propeller Displaycard
A Thimble Drome dealer display card showing propellers from a tiny 4"-2½ up to a mighty 9"-4.  The 3-blade props are for the Flying Tiger P-40 and the Super Sabre F-100 models (1958).

And then there were those propellers!  Of course made from solid Nylon - not only tough enough to withstand your search for the holy grail of a perfect landing, but even DUBL-TUF...

Today, most people stay away from "EXTRA Flexibility" propellers, but would still be interested in buying a nice propeller for 20 cents.

A more usual propeller package as you would have bought it in your local hobby shop around 1960. Price raised to a whopping 25 cents per prop.

1945
L. M. Cox Manufacturing Co., Inc.  founded by L. M. Cox.

1947
Cox
moves to Poinsettia Avenue, Santa Ana.

1952
Bill Selzer joins the company.

1963
Cox
moves to East Warner Avenue, Santa Ana.

1965
Cox International Ltd., Hong Kong established.

1969
L. M. Cox sells his Company to Leisure Dynamics.

1970
 January 19: Bill Selzer appointed president of L.M. Cox Mfg. Co. Inc. (a subsidiary of Leisure Dynamics)

1971
Manufacturing is partially moved to Minneapolis.

1983
Bill Selzer buys company from bankrupt Leisure Dynamics.

1995
50th anniversary.

1996
Cox is
sold to Estes / Centuri Corp.

2005
Estes moves Cox back to the hobby market. 60th anniversary.

2009
February 6: Estes shuts its Cox  division down.
The inventory was sold to several parties.
 

Today, a limited selection of engines, spare parts and related stuff is available from:
Cox International and XENALOOK
and
Cox  Engines Europe
and
Model Engines and Parts Warehouse
and
EX Model Engines
and
Toy Decals

The stuff which powered your dreams, smelled great, and left ugly stains on your trousers!

A Cox fuel can. Another one. and ... a third can.

the 1960s

the 1970s  the 1980s

Each year, new models were added to the range of Cox powered models.
Often the same model re-appeared in a new outfit or in a different color scheme.

 

 

The "Bendix Trophy Racer" came ready to fly in an eye catching Avion Flight Set box (1964).
 

The early Cox catalogues presented the models in such great artists impressions.

Thimble Drome Paper Bag

This spare part paper bag shows the Thimble Drome (TD) logo and mentions the TEM-TROL temperature control system used for the manufacturing process. Due to constant temperatures and high coolant flow rates, it was possible to achieve excellent precision and high quality standards, long before the era of CNC machines.

I want to note that most of the contents of these web pages became possible due to communication via the internet, because of nice people who answered my stupid questions. Especially helpful has been the extremely thorough historical research by Dan Sitter, published in the Engine Collectors Journal (ECJ). Additional important information came from Ken Croft, Bob Gardner, Paul Gibeault, Peter Tarn, Larry Renger, Joe Wagner, Max Zuijdendorp, and many others.

Thank you all for sharing small bits and large chunks of information!

My pages about the Cox company and their products are purely non-commercial and intended to preserve a chapter of model aviation history as well as fond memories. A lot of effort and time went into its text, graphics and layout which are protected by copyrighted law. You may not use any material from this web site without permission for commercial purposes. The copyright to directly reproduced Cox material belongs to the original company and possibly its legal successors. Estes-Cox has been informed about the full content of these pages in the year 2000.

Last modification of this page: 16.02.08

[Back to Home Page] Suggestions? Corrections? Remarks? e-mail: Martin Hepperle.

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© 1996-2012 Martin Hepperle
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